Artesania Racks

Unique High-End Audio Racks out of Spain
Touch the Perfection
Artesania Audio was founded over 20 years ago by José Luis Lafarga, Acoustic Engineer and Audiophile in Barbastro, Aragon (Spain). Our company's main objective is to improve the perception of sound and listening thanks to the rack where the equipment is installed. Artesanía Audio, is devoted to the effective treatment of resonances of a vibrational origin using a technology called "Acoustic Anti-Resona

Artesanía-audio with its unique Acoustic Engineering Board is committed to the effective treatment of resonance from vibrations since 1993. Jose Luis Lafarga and his team develop the Acoustic Anti-resonance treatment technology into the design and handmade furniture production for audio and audio/video components achieving outstanding linearity and neutrality in sound production.

REVIEWERS QUOTE: "Artesania Audio is still one of our favourite components. We can pretty much can say that without this rack we wouldn't have been able to evaluate properly our studio line and Absolute Sounds line of products. We hardly recommend that those of you who are on the upgrade path and have spent good money on super high end products to harmonise your system with the purchase of this rack. Please note that now there are also available different sizes of mass dampers, which act as dampers and RF shields to match your components precisely."

This name is given to the sophisticated technology developed by the Acoustic Engineering Board lead by José Luis Lafarga. 

This innovative technology has been applied to the hand-made equipment manufactured by Artesanía-audio over the last 15 years; units, frames, audio-racks, supports and accessories. 

The aim of this superior technology is to isolate all electronic components that are installed in the units whether they are active or passive (record players, CD players, power supply units, processors, speakers etc.) from any type of vibration that could influence their performance. The ultimate objective is absolute neutrality.

Isolation is necessary because when we listen to musical sounds in an acoustic setting, they can be affected by vibrations in the electronic equipment. These may originate in a solid source such as the floor or may be air borne such as sonic waves, and as a consequence will generate secondary vibrations in the equipment. These reverberations can only be eliminated by incorporating shock absorbing techniques and/or suspension, a process that generates a change in the caloric energy of acoustics.

In addition, electronic components used for sound reproduction also produce friction and vibrations that originate in their drive mechanisms and turntables. This can produce noise distortion and generate unwanted sounds such as humming or buzzing that become part of the overall sound transmitted by the speakers. The intensity of this distortion is often increased by “feedback.” Musical sound experiences therefore can be distorted considerably. 

Sound equipment is constantly being improved and enhanced. However, sound equipment alone - however sophisticated - cannot guarantee the prevention of the factors that affect sound quality, as they are inherent to the sound itself and its transmission. 

Since its very foundation, Artesanía-audio has aimed to obtain materials and design products that either prevent or eliminate external causes of alterations and distortions in sound. At the same time, the company aims to prevent or reduce noise generated in the actual sound equipment, with the overall objective of achieving musical reproduction that is clean, balanced, lineal and neutral. 

With this is in mind, the company has always taken into consideration the most up to date studies in acoustic technology and vibration analysis of technical systems. This, together with continual experimentation and innovation, has allowed the company to develop sophisticated technology, which we call acoustic anti-resonance treatment. 

Acoustic anti-resonance treatment eliminates or significantly reduces the harmful effects produced in sound equipment from solid sources (such as the floor), acoustic sound production (e.g. air borne vibrations) and interaction between components (such as feedback). Specifically:

Eliminates the “chime” effect (from vibrations) that is common with metal racks and units that do not incorporate our technology. Our tubular metal structures are filled with material of different masses and elastomers that are capable of absorbing vibrations.

In addition, out metal structures are painted with a special diffusing paint with a slight grain that leave a light emboss on the surfaces, which helps to eliminate acoustic specular reflection.  

Eliminates resonance from the shelves (passive modulation) and horizontal movement. Our shelves are made from a double layer of pressed glass “sandwiched” together and supported by isolating polyamide discs and neoprane pads for maximum absorption and block. In turn, the discs are supported on steel pins that rest on the metal shelving. The combination of these various gradients reduces the speed of propagation (to reduce transmission) and this, together with the different absorption coefficients, improves the overall effectiveness of the shock absorption.

Eliminates vibrations that are transmitted from solid and acoustic sources through the creation of decouples; steel needles supported on isolating discs. These provide extra tiers of anti-resonant protection. Depending upon the model, we install a double or triple decouple; the suspended audio rack has a triple decouple.

Eliminates the Larsen effect produced by feedback from solid parameters such as floors, walls and ceilings.

Reduces the “rumble” effect. Dull and prolonged sounds produced by parasitic vibrations from digital or analogical readers as a result of shock absorption defects or the suspension of motors and other mechanisms.

Substantially reduces “jitters” produced in digital readers due to a lack of stability in the CD fixing and rotation systems.

Some of our accessories (anti-magnetic dampers) eliminate interference brought about by radio and electro-magnetic waves, as well as reducing vibrations from the chassis of sound systems.

All product components chosen by Artesanía-audio (structures, treatments, audio-racks, shelves, pads, discs etc.) increase absorption coefficients and deaden resonance throughout the whole system.

The effect of this treatment is to reduce (up to 80-90% depending upon the unit) the lowest frequencies (that have the widest range and longest waves) transforming their resonance point into higher frequencies (lower in terms of range and wavelength) that do not effect the listening experience.

The overall result of using this unique treatment in our products is the elimination of inter-modulation distortion (originating in vibrations) in electronics, especially in digital and analogical systems. 

The application of this technology to the design and production of Artesanía-audio units and tables, results in a controlled listening experience that is dynamic and clean; free of background reverberations and unwanted noise that mask the true sound. There is absolutely no doubt that our systems surpass other models and brands that do not incorporate our unique and innovative technology in terms of sound reproduction.

Each one of our products incorporates its own unique characteristics as described in our catalogue and on this website. 

Ineffectual units that do not incorporate acoustic treatments (more than 95% of audio-racks and accessories available on the international market) are incapable of controlling vibrations and unable to aid tonal balance in sound reproduction. 

The Artesanía-audio products effectively reduce resonance and achieve a neutral sound as a result. In addition, the suspended rack units, with their unique double structure and smart design that does away with the need for fixed shelves, incorporate innovative technology that is unique to our brand at a world level.

Our products are a breath of fresh air for audiophiles and music fans alike and afford noticeable benefits in their listening experiences 

The Artesanía-audio products are accessories that improve the quality of sound beyond all doubt. They provide a huge leap in terms of other accessories that you may have tried (filters, connection decks, electronic components etc.) that often have a much higher price tag that our specially treated units. The thousands of users in Spain that have bought our products are our best form of publicity and speak highly of the improvements they have achieved in their sound installations.

On our webpage you will find technical information, the opinions of many of our customers and reports from specialist magazines. 

Many comments from customers and specialists alike include the phrase “Bordering on perfection.”
……..José Luis Lafarga and team.

Featured

All Products

Reviews

Testimonials

Videos

Featured

AE 14 RK EX 4L
NZ$ 7,995.00 (incl. GST)
PLATFORMA stainless steel, anti-magnetic structure supports a specially treated base to set up a turntable or other components. Different versions and materials are available. STAINLESS STEEL TOP...
Unique Exoteryc audio rack FeaturesSDS - Suspended Double Structure tech3D - Triple DecouplingAAT...
Eduardo de Lima prototyped his Audiopax Model 88 amplifier in steel, aluminum and brass. Though he...
AE 15 RK EX 3T
NZ$ 10,995.00 (incl. GST)
PLATFORMA stainless steel, anti-magnetic structure supports a specially treated base to set up a turntable or other components. Different versions and materials are available. STAINLESS STEEL TOP...
Unique Exoteryc audio rack FeaturesSDS - Suspended Double Structure tech3D - Triple DecouplingAAT...
Eduardo de Lima prototyped his Audiopax Model 88 amplifier in steel, aluminum and brass. Though he...
AE 26 RK DAMP
NZ$ 325.00 (incl. GST)
Unique anti-magnetic RF-shielding damper discs to be placed atop sensitive equipment. WHAT THEY DO?   Dampers are anti-magnetic and shock absorbing masses that act against vibrations generated...

All Products

Audio Racks & Speaker Stands

AE 14 RK EX 4L
NZ$ 7,995.00 ea (incl. GST)
PLATFORMA stainless steel, anti-magnetic structure supports a specially treated base to set up a turntable or other components. Different versions and materials are available. STAINLESS STEEL TOP...
Unique Exoteryc audio rack FeaturesSDS - Suspended Double Structure tech3D - Triple DecouplingAAT...
Eduardo de Lima prototyped his Audiopax Model 88 amplifier in steel, aluminum and brass. Though he...
AE 15 RK EX 3T
NZ$ 10,995.00 ea (incl. GST)
PLATFORMA stainless steel, anti-magnetic structure supports a specially treated base to set up a turntable or other components. Different versions and materials are available. STAINLESS STEEL TOP...
Unique Exoteryc audio rack FeaturesSDS - Suspended Double Structure tech3D - Triple DecouplingAAT...
Eduardo de Lima prototyped his Audiopax Model 88 amplifier in steel, aluminum and brass. Though he...
AE 16 RK EX 4T
NZ$ 15,995.01 ea (incl. GST)
“ Music Sounded bigger, better recorded, you could hear more into the recording and the frequency extremes were as effortless and natural as the mid-band ”.....(HI-FI +, UK)
Unique Exoteryc audio rack FeaturesSDS - Suspended Double Structure tech3D - Triple DecouplingAAT...
Eduardo de Lima prototyped his Audiopax Model 88 amplifier in steel, aluminum and brass. Though he...
AE 17 RK EX ASG
NZ$ 2,995.00 ea (incl. GST)
TREATED GLASS AMP STANDExoteryc version dimensions: 725 x 570 mm (supports 200 kg) Stainless steel anti-magnetic structure supports a specially treated base to set up a turntable or other...
AE 18 RK EX ASK
NZ$ 3,995.00 ea (incl. GST)
KRION AMP STAND: Dimensions: 725 x 570 mm (supports 200 kg) It’s made of two-thirds natural minerals (ATH-Aluminium trihydride) and a low percentage of high resistance resins. Adjustable...
AE 19 RK EX TPD
Price on application
DIGITAL SERVER PLATFORM Available only for Exoteryc Rack. Dimensions: 70 0x 550 mm (supports 100 kg) It’s made of MDF with a layer of neoprene and special paint.Adjustable decoupling needles for...
AE 20 RK EX TPG
NZ$ 2,995.00 ea (incl. GST)
TREATED GLASS PLATFORM: Exoteryc version dimensions: 725 x 570 mm (supports 200 kg) Stainless steel anti-magnetic structure supports a specially treated base to set up a turntable or other...
AE 21 RK EX TPK
NZ$ 3,995.00 ea (incl. GST)
KRION PLATFORM Available only for Exoteryc Rack. Dimensions: 725 x 570 mm (supports 200 kg) It’s made of two-thirds natural minerals (ATH-Aluminium trihydride) and a low percentage of high...
AE 22 RK EX TPGT
NZ$ 7,500.00 ea (incl. GST)
TREATED GLASS DOUBLE WIDTH PLATFORM: Exoteryc version dimensions: 1300 x 570 mm (supports 200 kg) Stainless steel anti-magnetic structure supports a specially treated base to set up a turntable...
AE 24 RK EX SG
NZ$ 395.00 ea (incl. GST)
While other companies search for solid materials with good anti-vibrational response, Artesania Audio has developed racks without shelves and totally isolated. The result is that the electronics...
AE 25 RK EX SK
NZ$ 695.00 ea (incl. GST)
KRION SHELF: Available only for Exoteryc Rack. Can ssupport 200 kg It’s made of two-thirds natural minerals (ATH-Aluminium trihydride) and a low percentage of high resistance resins....
AE 26 RK DAMP
NZ$ 325.00 ea (incl. GST)
Unique anti-magnetic RF-shielding damper discs to be placed atop sensitive equipment. WHAT THEY DO?   Dampers are anti-magnetic and shock absorbing masses that act against vibrations generated...

Reviews

I found its performance to be surprisingly effective at lowing the noise floor and allowing the music to come through in most neutral, clean and three-dimensional manner.
Leon Rivkin

The overall sense of freedom of constriction or constrain in the low frequencies has given bass greater definition.  

it has eclipsed my reference with well over US$10k - US$15k worth of tweaks added on top of its US$5k asking price!All in all

I love this rack even more. I'm just glad that when serendipity came and knocked on my front door, someone was home.

Do you believe in serendipity? Do you think when all of a sudden, just when the universe sends gifts your way that it's “meant to be?”  Or just some statistical fluke? I tend to dismiss them as a weird statistical noise of sort and move on with my life. Here is a "meant to be" situation which I almost dismissed as a statistical fluctuation.
 
I've always been very keen on vibration control for my components. Early demonstration of benefits of vibration control by audio guru Bill Brassington made me a true believer in the benefits of component isolation long ago. Almost immediately, I dished my stylish Bell'O glass equipment rack and ventured in to the deep and mysterious world of high-end isolation racks. Through my trails and tribulations I ended up settling on Solid Tech's Rack of Silence. The large 5-shelf model offered enough room for me to try a combination of different tweaks for each component. Of course, this means I tried everything: rollerballs, footers, pucks, magnets and cones. Many were sandwiched between, on top and under carbon fiber, marble, wood or acrylic shelves. Needless to say, countess hours were spent attempting to fine-tune  my rack. And to some degree I think I was successful at obtaining a sound that was highly resolving and enjoyable.  As time went by I ventured into purchasing a vinyl rig and that presented problems as space became an issue.
 
The arrival of the massive (four-chassis) Jadis JP200 preamp forced me realize rather quick and abruptly that I finally outgrew my Solid Tech iso-rack.  Looking for a solution, I called cable guru Serguei Timachev, owner of Stealth Audio Cables. Over the years Timachev has demonstrated a keen ear and eye for outstanding products.  "Artesania Audio..." were his first and only words of advice on the subject of my finding a new iso-rack. Timachev informed that me that – a few of his dealers in Europe and some of his customers were swearing by the Artsania Audio iso-rack. An hour later George Vatchnadze of Kyomi Audio Chicago  calls me to share his experience at the Munich Show (2012) and gave me and earful on these new wonderful looking spanish built racks. Obviously impressed by what he witnessed, George went on to express his interest in becoming a US dealer.
 
As soon as George hung up I got call from Clement Perry (CP). He also gave me plenty on the Munich Show and at the end of our conversation asked me if I would be interested in hearing a great isolation from Italy – Exoteric Rack made by, of course Artesania Audio. That’s when I put it all together: Serguei Timachev and George were talking about same shelf!  Three honorable mentions in one day! And on top of it an offer to a possible review (since I mentioned months earlier my desire and write again). Not to mention how desperately  I needed a new rack. So I selfishly told CP it would be my honor to hear this newest rack from Artesania Audio.
 
After going over configuration I told CP my ideal system requirements would  be two 4-tier racks. One with a glass top to support my Acoustic Solid Royal turntable and one without for my electronics. Upon their delivery some weeks later, I had a couple audiophile friends come down and assist me. As we opened both crates boxes down we all shook our heads in disbelief. I’ve seen many pictures of the Artesania Exoteryc and knowing the price, I expected to see another good looking rack.  It’s not just a beautifully built,  but the overall attention to detail and the quality of workmanship places them in an entirely different category. The Exoteryc screams high quality with zero glitter. The Esoteryc comes to do a job. And I love its ulitarian dress code. 
 
The Exoteryc's outer-frame is made of four high-density metal tubes that support four independent metal support beams. The metal tubes, I'm told, are filled with a damping material to ward off any hint of ring and resonance. Each of tier (4) of support are smartly designed on nylon bushings to serve as shock absorbers. By the way, each support beam is fully height adjustable thanks to the stainless steel metal rods which support them. My only job after getting the Exoteryc out of its crate was finding the correct width for each component to rest atop the nylon fitted feet. Lastly, the base spikes that support the entire Exoteryc were designed with huge chrome cups to guard against damaging wooden floors or carpet.    
 
We listened to my system for a good half-hour for reminder's sake.  The three-man setup turned out to be a breeze (thanks in part to the very informative video on YouTube). It took, maybe 45 minutes total. And that included breaking down and removing the old rack. Keep in mind, I've two Exoteryc racks side by side. One with its  beautiful three-layered glass laminate top to support my vinyl rig. The other is without.  Of course, I am proud to announce that I was able to get all of my components on the Exoteryc and that includes the 4-chassis Jadis preamp as well.
 
Less is More
 
Our first impression was that the sound had not changed much. Maybe, a hair more presence and air and bloom. But these differences were oh so small I wondered whether it was my imagination. I was frazzled. My cohorts John and Alex agreed the differences were not night and day. John admitted to hearing a slight improvement while Alex claimed the system sounded no different.  I started to become disappointed  until John pointed at the HUGE pile of tweaks resting in the middle of the floor. He rolled his eyes and exclaimed – “Dude – the Exoteryc is doing same thing ALL THAT attempted to do!” Then, it hit me – it took me years to optimize these tweaks under my components. Years,  I remind you. The Artesania Exoteryc rack was performing at the same or slightly higher right out of the box! In my case, the addition of Artesania - and the subtraction of about $10k in tweaks - maintained the panoramic soundstage I've come admire in my Perfect 8 line-source loudspeakers (model The Force). Midbass, for example sounded slightly more neutral.  But to my taste, lighter and with less weight. Voices however, remained engaging and holographic while high frequencies retained their life and luster. 
 
So, as expected, we tried to tweak it. 
 
 
Different shelves, cones, spikes, rollersballs etc. Almost all of the combinations made the sound worse. Some combinations were able to maintain a high level of performance. but nothing really improved the overall performance.  One set of nylon feet sounded better under DAC than the Polyurethane feet.  In the end, the same story kept coming back – the Exoteryc rack sounds best as is. My Acoustic Solid turntable sitting atop the three-tier glass shelf only reinforced my position as to this being an easy candidate for the best rack I have encountered due to the sense of substance it added to the bottom end of my beloved vinyl rig . Further, it's among the only rack that I have ever heard that proved tweak-proof.  I discovered just turning up the bass, ever so slightly, on my woofer's crossover gave me the added weight I desired in the midbass. Now, for some reason, the sound of the midbass, after a small adjustment, had improved the speed and timbre. Go figure. Maybe this is due to the midbass coming more from the source rather than the rack (and the plethora of tweaks)? Perhaps. But one thing is certain, I can hear the difference. More importantly, I like the differences.   
 
After about two months of comparing a VAC reference pre against the Jadis, it was relinquished  into a second system in another part of the house. My significant other then posed a very honest question "Since you no longer need racks capable of holding nine components how do you justify buying such an expensive rack?" "Very simple, I responded. - I sold my entire arsenal of tweaks from my other rack and purchased the Exoteryc!" The Exoteryc also gives me the extra space required to move components in and out. I also find the Exoteryc very convenient for future reviewing duties due to it being infinitely more flexible. To me the Exoteryc is a clear winner even without its gorgeous looks, wonderful ergonomics and easy accessibility. It’s a keeper based purely on the safety and sonic merits. In addition to that everybody compliment me on the looks and my girlfriend loves the look.
 
CP came over for a regular Saturday afternoon visit some weeks after the Exoteryic's installation. I make no apologies that I do get a little nervous when CP comes. And for good reason. First, he's got perhaps the finest system I have heard  anywhere bar none (and I'm not saying that because he's my editor or friend, I say that because it is actually true). His system has become legendary in these parts so you can ask anyone that has visited his place if you don't believe me. What's more frustrating is you don't get the level of sound he's obtained by simply buying wildly expensive gear. Trust me, I know because I have spent way too much already trying to surpass his sound. I think I might have equaled it with the addition of these racks. Needless to say I was nervous as to what he might hear. Surprisingly, all he had to say after putting on one of his music samplers was "Wow Leon, the speed, body and overall articulation has taken a huge leap forward. This is easily the best your system has sounded. Congratulations!"
 
Update.
 
After living with Artesania Exoteryc racks since the fall of 2012, and doing some additional experimentation, I discovered, believe it or not, that grounding the racks using the provided ground straps improved their performance considerably. In my case, I grounded them to an independent ground – preferably a true earth ground - located in my backyard. This removed an additional layer of low-level grunge and gave my system a better insights to its inner details and dynamics. I also found the Artesania accessory called the Disk Weights, do in fact improve the performance of lighter made products such as an inexpensive PC DAC, DVD player or Music Server.
 
I've since become settled in with my new Artesania racks and admit that I'm enjoying my system's overall performance like never before. The overall sense of freedom of constriction or constrain in the low frequencies has given bass greater definition.  
 
In the end, I put in a lot of the time putting my former rack together. I've not had the Artesania Audio Exoteryc for a fraction of that time and it has eclipsed my reference with well over $10k - $15k worth of tweaks added on top of its $5k asking price!  I now can conclude that not only does the Artesania Exoteryc isolation platform work but I found its performance to be surprisingly effective at lowing the noise floor and allowing the music to come through in most neutral, clean and three-dimensional manner. 
 
All in all I love this rack even more. I'm just glad that when serendipity came and knocked on my front door, someone was home.
for someone with a good reference system for example, the Artesania represents an excellent and obvious upgrade. It works!
Alan Sircom

The F-E stand has been highly praised time and again for its musical structure and harmonic richness, but the Artesania takes those musical aspects and runs with them. Music sounded bigger, better recorded, you could hear more into the recording and the frequency extremes were as effortless and natural as the mid-band. It's worth remembering this wasn't playing through a mediocre system that was already running at half-mast. This was a state of the art system ending in full range loudspeakers that was already sounding pretty damn good on the F-E stand and sounded a good deal better when component after component moved over to the Artesania.

Over the course of 2013, we shall be looking at the aspects surrounding audio, as well as audio itself. We will be investigating a variety of different kinds of acoustic coupling, decoupling and uncoupling systems to bring your equipment to life. We will also be investigating the importance of room treatments of all kinds, because improving the performance of the room can significantly enhance the performance of the system in that room. We will also see how these important elements can be tied together to make a good sound great.
 
As ever with audiophilia, we will start back-to-front; although room acoustic treatment will produce the largest changes to the sound of a system, generally the treatment itself is best approached on a case-by-case basis; although there are some broad topics that can be described, the topic itself needs some understanding of the mathematics and physics involved, and this will be better sidled up to than ran into headlong. So, we start instead with what keeps the equipment in place
 
There are almost as many concepts behind equipment supports as there are pieces of equipment to support. The days of everything defaulting to the 'light, but rigid' shelf are behind us; we now have mass-loading, decoupling, tables as low and high-pass filters, cones, cups, air bladders, squidgy hockey pucks, blocks of wood, rollers and more. There are resonance controllers, resonance absorbers, resonance channels, non-magnetic supports and even magnetic field introduction agencies. These devices can be made out of grass, tree, glass, plastic, rubber or unobtanium. Each one has its ardentsupporters; each one has its febrile detractors. And there are those who reject all of this and go to Ikea.
 
Put another way, there are three kinds of equipment supports; those that just provide support, those that do something for the sound, and those that do the wrong kind of something. Our task as reviewers is to discover whether the last is actually worse than the first and whether it is a universal 'bad' or simply doing the right things to the wrong products.
 
We'll start this survey with what seems like the new kid in town, but one that's been causing a stir in more traditional high-end circles on the QT for some time; Artesania Audio Esoteric, from Spain.
Artesania's goal is to rid any component on one of its products from the risk of vibration, either from the surroundings or from other components in the signal path. And in some respects, the stand is also designed to prevent products from themselves. When used correctly, each 'shelf' (actually articulated steel arms) can be individually adjusted for the optimum height and a device rests on four neoprene and nylon feet, resting on upturned spikes in an adjustable frame that itself hangs from nylon bushes and is prevented from moving by neoprene coated screw heads at the bottom of the stand. In essence, each component on the Artesania is a decoupled device sitting on a decoupled platform inside a decoupled frame. Optional glass shelves fit on the neoprene/nylon isolation feet, and there is a large triple-dampened glass shelf, sitting on spikes and isolated by neoprene and nylon pads.
 
Finally, each component on the stand gets its own damper (which looks like a large-spool Super-8 film can) that sits as close to the centre of that device's top plate, and the whole stand sits on large neoprene and polyamide feet.
 
With careful measurement of each component needed to find the right places to seat the isolation feet, precise adjustment of each component's position in a three-dimensional space and just an all-round level of care and attention required to install and set-up the system, swapping over from an existing table to the Artesania is no 20 second swap-over. It's more like a careful two-man operation. The more free space around the stand the better. Nevertheless, it is possible to move from one stand to another in reasonably short order, and we compared the Artesania to the Finite Elemente Pagode Master Reference stand, a very popular choice round these parts. We concentrated mostly on devices that would naturally benefit from a change in stand — such as CD transports and valve DACs, where stray vibration could create potentially audible differences in performance — but also went to the other extreme, swapping a solid-state power supply from table to table. This last should elicit no change whatsoever in theory, being both notionally impervious to microphony (no valves) and lacking any active circuitry directly in the signal chain.
 
Moving from stand to stand did significantly change the sound quality of the system. There was more going on. A lot more. The F-E stand has been highly praised time and again for its musical structure and harmonic richness, but the Artesania takes those musical aspects and runs with them. Music sounded bigger, better recorded, you could hear more into the recording and the frequency extremes were as effortless and natural as the mid-band. It's worth remembering this wasn't playing through a mediocre system that was already running at half-mast. This was a state of the art system ending in full range loudspeakers that was already sounding pretty damn good on the F-E stand and sounded a good deal better when component after component moved over to the Artesania.
 
I suppose the easiest way of considering this is the F-E stand has a distinct sound it imparts upon the products that sit upon it. It's a slightly dark, very musical presentation. The Artesania doesn't do this at all. It strives to limit the sound of the table, instead relying on the sound of the components in the system to deliver the sonic goods. And that can make good things sound truly remarkable. When the best of the best sits on the Artesania, they raise their game. Even — and I have no idea why this should be — when moving the power supply of a two-box CD-transport from one stand to the other. Spinning discs, tubes... I get; getting the rest of the world out of the equation can give these items the chance to give their best, and when dealing with thoroughbreds, they need thoroughbred care and feeding. But a power supply??
 
Two interesting observations drop out of this. First, unlike many of the 'top table' contenders, this is a revolution, but not a coup. The Artesania 'sound' (more accurately 'absence of sound') is an addictive one, but it doesn't enforce other components to change to Artesania at a stroke. Yes, if all your ducks are in a row, so things get ever better (the improvements wrought by a power supply demonstrate that), but if in the transition to an all-Artesania system, you mix and match, the sound does not get worse, before it gets better.
 
Next, the Artesania might be a double-edged sword. By relying on the performance of the equipment and the equipment alone — something many equipment manufacturers talk about, but in reality few actually achieve — some components might not be as wonderful as their marketing claims.
 
Aside from the weight involved, building a 19" rack within a larger, rigid frame means — platform for platform — the Artesania support system is physically bigger than most. And although its dark grey or green uprights, its chrome, optional glass and white nylon bushes are not a problem for those fortunate enough to listen in their own dedicated man-caves, but might be a harder sell for those who share their listening space with family members.
 
It's also a demanding installation, requiring two people to extract, place and  position the stand, and not just because it weighs close to 150kg all up for the biggest option. A nine-minute YouTube instructional video shows how to install the stand and it's not PR guff and filler. Have a space allocated in advance, a lot of room to unpack and build and a good day getting everything in place. If you have the system that can benefit from such an exercise though, it's more than worth it.
 
While it might transform the sound of an entry level electronics, this is functionally untenable for most people. On the other hand, for someone with a good reference system for example, the Artesania represents an excellent and obvious upgrade. It works!
the added emotionality that this rack is able to squeeze out of my system is quite simply staggering.
Christiaan Punter - Hi-Fi Advice

The Artesania Exoteryc is quite simply the best audio rack that I have used. Not only is it flawless in design and adjustability; soundwise it is also perfect and a massive improvement over any rack that I have used. It takes the best qualities of Finite Elemente's Spider Rack and adds tonal richness, better low level resolution, deeper black, a more solid soundstage with better focus, deeper, more powerful bass and a superbly natural sound. And it does all this while retaining treble fluidity and airyness, overall articulation and dynamic expression.

There are only a handful of brands that make ultra high end audioracks. There's Harmonic Resolution Systems (HRS), Copulare, Finite Elemente, Grand Prix and Symposium. And then there's Artesania. The latter is something special. It is a rack with a classical appearance that hides its high-tech nature in plain sight. I had never seen one in person but the photos looked so very promising and the idea behind it so interesting that I became massively intrigued.
 
Intro
Over the coarse of the last 10 years I have heard and compared various audioracks and have always found the Finite Element Spider to be the clear winner in terms of neutrality, unrestricted dynamics, low level resolution and lack of colouration. And of course the modular system is ideal for persons who often change their system configuration. Sonically there wasn't much that the Spider detracted: a slightly thinner sound was its only vice. Still, as my system evolved I have been entertaining the idea of moving to a more upscale audiorack for quite some time.
 
Now that my system was almost exclusively silver-coloured, my aim was to get a more classical, dark-coloured rack. The Spider was just getting a bit too Fischer-Price and too aluminium-esque for me after all these years. Also: the modular nature of the rack, although fabulous in idea, also meant that elements bought over time were never 100% fitting. I would always struggle to get all pillars exactly level. I'm a perfectionist that way.
 
But the new rack would have to be at least as good sonically and as versatile as the Spider. After all: my setup changes a lot and a rack with fixed shelves wouldn't work. Quite soon I stumbled on the world's most esoteric racks but was baffled at their prices. PARTicular, Harmonic Resolution Systems, Rethm and finally Artesania. The latter really took my fancy! Viewed from a distance it seems as simple as a regular rack but from the sides and upon close inspection its high-tech nature is revealed. The Artesania Esoteric rack is basically a frame suspended from the top within another frame. Theoretically this would mean that the bottom level should sound as good as the top level, or maybe, even better. What's even better is that there are no shelves but only frames with integrated feet to rest the component's belly's on, much like with Spider. But this time the levels are infinitely adjustable in height.
 
Even though a Spider isn't exactly cheap, I think that its quality more than justifies its price. And after having compared it to various other racks I just accepted that quality has its price. Recently, the idea of spending a lot more than Spider's entry price on a rack was starting to sound ever more reasonable. Non-audiophiles may struggle to understand that spending many thousands on a piece of audio furniture can seem like a good investment to anyone but it is quite simply just a gradual process. While getting better and better equipment at ever steeper prices, one get accustomed to the principle. So it became to be that I was ready for a super-high end rack. Surely it wouldn't be out of place as long as it costs less than any one component that it housed? I took the plunge and ordered an Artesania Exoteryc audiorack.
 
About the name
While searching the internet, I found two different spellings for the name of the rack: Esoteric and Exoteryc. It made me wonder which was correct. I asked mr Cayetano Castellano who handles international press matters for mr Jose Luis Lafarga, the designer of the rack. The reason is simple: originally the rack was called Esoteric but because a Japanese company had registered this as a brand name, Artesania changed the name to Exoteryc.
 
Functionality
The Artesania Exoteryc has a very special trick up its sleeve that upon first inspection might not be immediately obvious: it is essentially a rack suspended within another rack, the inner rack being thin and elegant and the outer being solid and heavy. On the detailed photos it is clear to see how this works: four polyamide dampers are screwed to extensions of the four big pillars with a neoprene ring sandwiched tightly in between. The inner rack in turn rests its spikes on top of the polyamide dampers. The whole is surprisingly sturdy: there's no wiggle, even without optimally aligning the anti-pendular movement screws in the bottom. By the way: the rack is not only super-solid but also acoustically dead: there's absolutely no ringing anywhere, which goes a long way explaining its weight of more than 60KG (132 Pounds)!
 
Within the suspended rack, there are normally 3 levels (60cm version) or 4 levels (90cm version) equipment levels, all infinitely adjustable. For my rack I have ordered on extra level so that all my sources can be housed within the rack, with the top position left vacant for reviewing purposes. The total weight that the suspended cage can carry is 150KG which is more than enough even for me and my heavy Jeff Rowland equipment. If you have a turntable you can also order an optional thick sandwiched glass top level. Besides the 60cm and 90 cm single racks there's also a Tandem version.
 
Each level has two beautifully polished stainless steel bars with pre-drilled thread in them which allow a great deal of flexibility of feet placement in the lateral plane. The two bars are in turn freely positionable in the horizontal plane and can be fixed with two big screws when the perfect position is found.
 
The white component feet are placed on top of 4 sharp steel spikes and sit snugly thanks to a soft plastic insert. They work comparable to Finite Elemente Ceraballs that way. The feet themselves come in two flavours: with velvet top layer and with neoprene top layer. The manual states that the velvet ones can be used in circumstances where the listening room is well-treated and some over-damping can take place if the neoprene pads are used. I found the opposite to be true with the velvet ones sounding more "filtered", softer and lacking some bass articulation compared to the neoprene ones.
 
Additionally there are also two sets of pads for under the rack's feet: black neoprene ones and white polyamide ones. I understand from the manual that the white ones are default while the black neoprene ones are to be used in situations where the listening room is under-damped (very lively). For this one I didn't experiment and chose the harder wite ones for their suspected better articulation. After all, my system had been tuned using a Spider rack: racks do not get any more direct-coupled than that.
 
Also included are heavy dampers (15cm diagonally)  for placement on top of the components. They are covered with soft neoprene on the bottom so that they will never damage the equipment that they sit on.
 
All feet are individually adjustable. In fact: the entire rack is so easily adjustable in so many ways that it is simply a joy to use.
 
Finally, the kit also includes earth wire, spirit level, spanners and various hexagonal wrenches. This is a very, very complete product.
 
Listening Tests
First thing I wanted to know was how the rack performs from level to level. Some may not be aware of this phenomenon, but all rack I have used, tilt the character of the component from tight to fluid, depending on which level it is placed. The Spider rack for example sounds best when using the top level, no matter whether that is the top level of a 30cm, 60cm or 90cm rack. It is always the toplevel that sounds most free and agile. The Spider's bottom level by the way makes my equipment sound much too controlled and dry. So big is this effect that I never use the bottom level. Naturally I was curious to find out how the Artesania would perform from level to level.
 
Levinson 390S CD player
First guinea pig was the Levinson 390S CD player, which I moved from top position to bottom position and then back down level by level. Sure enough: there were clear differences in sound and funnily enough they were contrary to the effect that the Spider rack has. Of course this is only logical because the Spider is most tight at the bottom and most free at the top while for the Artesania Exoteryc this is the reverse because of its suspended "pendular" inner cage. But, with the Exoteryc, the sound never becomes overly tight as it does with the Spider.
 
The first thing I noticed after placing the Levinson placed on the Exoteryc top level after listening to it on the Spider's top level, was this immense authority. The sound was much fuller and more harmonic and seemingly a lot of stress had been shedded. The midrange, that was slightly forward with the Spider, was now simply majestic. In fact, the whole sound has this luxurious feel to it, as if I just switched from a Sony CD player to a Jeff Rowland (if they made a CD player...). For all its gloriousness, the sound is absolutely not dull. In fact it is very rhythmic and highly detailed. Low level resolution increases without introducing thinness or shoutyness. Very impressive. Going back made both mine and my listening pal's mouths fall open. We hadn't anticipated such a large difference. I was even scared for a typical case of win some - lose some. Definitely not the case here.
 
The top level, as would later turn out, makes the 390S sound most rhythmic and dynamic, with the best bass but also the most accurate/dry treble of all levels. The bottom level sounds more relaxed and a lot smoother, with very fluid treble. This level is slightly laidback and if I were to use the Levinson on this level then I'd have to do some cable rolling in order to retain the balance. Nothing serious though.
 
So, if the top level is slightly too dry for the Levinson and the bottom one is slightly too relaxed, certainly the perfect level should be somewhere inbetween, right? Yes indeed. It turned out that the second level from the top offers the best balance for the Levinson. Mind you - mileage will vary depending on chosen component and system synergy. Luckily the rack offers lots of tweaking possibilities. For example, if the Levinson was placed on the mid level (third level from the top), it would also be slightly relaxed but this was easily compensated for by sliding out the feet-supporting bars more toward the sides. Voila: more bass articulation while retaining smoothness!
 
More components
Thus far the rack was occupied only by the Levinson CD player. Now it was time to see how placing a heavy component on top (without connecting it) would influence the sound of the Levinson. The latter btw has its final position on the middle level. Again a big surprise: instead of the expected slight thickening, the sound opened up more. Treble is more airy and the whole sounds even more luxurious. To substantiate: removing the Meridian 818 made the sound flatter again. This promised something for when all components were positioned in the rack.
 
Jeff Rowland Aeris DAC
Reconnecting the Jeff Rowland Aeris DAC to the Levinson's digital output, as I normally do, made the expected improvement. As can be read in the Aeris review, this DAC is one of the very few to actually improve on the 390S's sound. The Aeris is made of one solid block of aluminium. It is very heavy and one wouldn't expect that it would be influenced in any way by the way that it is supported. But guess what? Switching the Aeris from the Spider rack to the Artesania again made for a big improvement. On the Artesania rack, the Rowland sounded even more like a Rowland: smooth and glorious and majestic yet highly neutral. I knew enough. I was done with the Spider and all components were to be moved to the Artesania.
 
Complete implementation
Setting up really isn't as complex as you'd think it might be. In fact I find it no more complex than setting up a Spider rack. But if you do need help, there's a video on youtube that very clearly explains it all. So, the time has come to listen to all components, setup in the Artesania Exoteryc rack. I started with the Aeris in top position and built from there. As long as you make sure that the outer structure is 100 level, then make sure the inner structure is also 100% level, you cannot go wrong. Start out with an imperfectly aligned element and you might end up having to do a whole lot of adjustments lateron, so I'd advise to take your time doing the initial setup. It'll save time in the end. The entire setup including some listening tests inbetween took me half a day. I guess it could have been a lot quicker if I didn't evaluate all possibilities on a component per component basis but the same has always been true for the times when I "reformatted" te Spider rack.
 
One last word on the build quality of the Artesania rack: it is 100% perfect! All elements are manufactured to the highest standards. There is no ringing anywhere, no rough edges and everything is geometrically perfect. The Exoteryc rack is a beautiful object and almost a piece of art and it instills a huge Pride of Ownership. The latter may not come cheap, but you certainly get a massive amount of quality for the outlay.
 
Listening to the entire setup
Oftentimes I conclude that a certain component has been like a teacher to me. The Wadia 861 was such a machine. It tought me about rhythm and about acoustical, natural sound. Once I had grown to love the Wadia-portrayal of piano and percussion, and voices too, many other CD players sounded synthetic to me. I never before knew that the Sony XA50ES sounded a bit "plasticky". In the same way, the Artesania has been like a teacher to me.
 
I have heard and used many different audio racks. Heavy ones, light ones, solid ones and floppy ones. One conclusion that I made early on was that wood was not my friend. At least, wooden platters weren't. MDF was worst. No matter the brand, wooden equipment supports would always sound coloured and oftentimes congested. Heavy racks with lots of damping or sandwiched layers would not colour as much but in turn rob the music of its free-flowing quality or reduce dynamics. Cabinets invariably sounded boxy and glass/steel racks would sound too pinched. At one time I actually liked the top levels of a simple steel Target stand, but its other levels very much degraded the sound quality. Which brings me to the other problem that I encountered early on: no matter the brand, every level sounds different depending on the level used. All this brought me to try the Finite Elemente Spider rack. I was immediately smitten for its configurability and uncoloured sound. As an added bonus, it increased low level detail, without adding pinch. Or so I thought all of the last 10 years. But I'm getting ahead of myself. To me, the Spider was the only rack that didn't add a boxyness to the sound. Sure it sounded a little leaner than most racks but you get a lot in return. The Spider was no different in variance across its levels, but there were various ways to tweak the sound: using ceraballs or rubber feet made a lot of difference, as did the positioning of the feet. Without exception the sound became looser with the feet positioned more toward the center, and tighter toward the outer sides. For the longest time, the Spider would be my rack of choice. I even compared it to the Pagode at some stage, and found that rack to sound coloured and restrained dynamically. Go figure.
 
Naturally, system synergy is a major factor in any comparison, but that's another story. The little intro above brings me back to the Artesania rack. For it, too, turns out to be like a teacher to me. It showed in an instant that the Spider rack was pinched and forward in the midrange and that it apparently shifts energy from the lower octaves into the higher octaves. What's more: compared to the Artesania, much like a Sony to a Wadia, the Spider rack sounds synthetic! The Spider doesn't begin to touch on the Artesania's pure, natural, full-colour sound. Even if the Spider rack is on balance a little more airy and agile, it just doesn't move me anymore after having listened to the Artesania. Such is the life of an audiophile. It is so easy to get used to better sound!
 
Work Of Art
Just look at the pictures below: isn't the Artesania Exoteryc audio rack a beatiful work of audio-art?
 
Final comments
The most important thing in audio is system synergy. Balance between components. No matter which component you buy, you will always have to take some effort bedding it in. It will rarely happen that you take out one component, plunge in another and everything is 100% better. The Artesania Exoteryc is no different. Even though it is better than the Spider rack in 90% of the areas, my system had been balanced with the Spider in place. This means that I have been compensating for its leannes and perhaps unknowingly also compensated for its forward midrange. It comes as no surprise then to find that the sound becomes a little out of balance after a huge change such as an equipment rack.
 
During the initial listening tests where the CD player was moved to the Artesania rack and the rest of the system was unchanged, there were only benefits. Adding the DAC also only added to that. But when the preamp was added, the sound tilted a little too much toward the smooth. Apparently, even though the Coherence II weighs 50KG, still it was influenced by the maximum swing effect offered by the Exoteryc's lowest level. For most music this was beneficial but for more rhythmic-driven music, it was a little too relaxed.
 
But this was nothing a little cable-rolling couldn't fix. After a lot of experimenting, what ultimately did the trick was a combination of mechanical and electrical tweaks. First I moved the feet under the CD player to the most outer position that the player would allow. Second I moved the powercable of the preamp from the Lapp extensionblock to the installationwire extensionblock, where the power amps already were. Lastly, I connected the supplied grounding wire to the top level at the one end and to the ground of the extensionblock at the other end.
 
Grounding
That last thing really surprised me. I knew from a friend's ungrounded system, that when we grounded it, we didn't like the sound. Although it became technically better, we felt that the conveyal of emotion was lessened. Naturally this is also all about system synergy. His system had been tweaked from the non-grounded starting point. In my case the situation was different in that the sound was a little off balance at the starting point and grounding the rack made the sound shift right in position. Still I was surprised by the amount of difference that grounding a rack can make. Perhaps a nice free tip for folks owning metal racks: try grounding it. You may or may not like the results, but I promise you that there will be a difference. How very cool that Artesania included it, too, or I might not even have tried it!.
 
Update june 2013
 
Using the Dampers
The package also includes a special damper for every level. I didn't try them until later because my components are so solid and heavy already, especially the Rowlands, that I figured it unneccesary. However, as it turned out, the AAZ Ultra Flow music server could do with a little extra weight. Adding the damper on top made for more colour and fulness in the midrange where it was previously slightly thin. Its overall sound became less computer-esque and more like the Levinson CD player. In the process, rhythm is also slightly reduced but the server has plenty of that so as not to tilt the balance too much either side.
 
Optional Turntable Platform
Initially I bought the rack without the optional Turntable Platform. I don't have a turntable and figured that I wouldn't need the space for anything else. But after some time and after looking at pictures of the complete rack, it started luring me and the thought occurred that it would be very convenient to have a large top shelf to arrange current CD's on, or to put review components on. What's more, visually I think the platform is stunning and really adds to the rack's appeal. While maintaining its beautiful architectural qualities, I think the rack becomes even more majestic when the platform is included.
 
Like the rack, the platform isn't cheap. But also like the rack, you get superb quality. The glass platter consists of three thick layers of glass, bonded by a rubbery substance. The glass platter alone weighs more than 40 kilograms! The steel construction fits perfectly and is fully adjustable: not only in height but also for each of the four cross bars, which are inserted into the standing pillars and fixed by two allen screws which themselves are hidden from view under the black neoprene pads onto which the glass platter rests.
 
Forget mantras about glass being "ringy", as the glass platter itself is so dense that it will definitely not ring. Slapping it with your knuckles produces only a low-key thud, much like it would if the platter were made from solid aluminium.
 
When assembled, the whole is super-sturdy and definitely won't move from its position. It absolutely cannot accidentally be nudged off the rack
 
Listening with the Turntable Platter in place
Seeing as the rack itself has such an elaborate and well-thought out system to eliminate vibrations and the turntable platform is coupled to the main pillars directly, it had to sound entirely different. And it does. I carried out a range of tests using various pieces of equipment. For this review I will focus on the use of the Meridian 506.24 CD player.
 
CD player on top of the Platform
As expected, the platform lends a different character to the sound than the suspended levels below it. On top of the glass platter, the Meridian's bass is more pronounced and has more power, the midrange is more forward and more "live" and treble is more accentuated and drier. Although this presentation is not unpleasant, and actually welcome with hard-pounding basslines, the sense of richness through the midrange and the colourful, relaxed nature that the other levels of the rack lend to the music are reduced.
 
CD player on the smaller optional glass platter
This smaller glass platter is also optionally available and can be useful when you need to place very narrow components on a shelf, or placing two narrow units next to each other. Like the big platform, this platter consists of three layers sandwiched layers of glass albeit much thinner ones. Although lighter in weight, still this platter doesn't ring when you knock on it. But in use, it does sound a little like what you'd expect a glass platter to sound like: extra articulate in the midbass and extra pronounced in the midrange, while treble is a little harder. But this phenomenom would later turn out to be triggered by standing waves caught between the two glass layer more than by the mechanical coupling of the component sitting on it, but more on that later.
 
CD player on the rack's own feet
With the platform still in place and the CD player placed on the rack's own feet, the Meridian sounds best. Quite obviously a lot of thought has gone into the design of the rack and its suspension system and it just shows. Compared to sitting on the top level, the player now sounds a little less dynamic and pace is a little slower but the overall balance is much better. From the lowest bass to the highest treble the sound is just more complete and more harmonically rich. With some CD's such as those from Groove Armada, the extra propulsion in the bass and lower midrange that the Turntable Platform added were very welcome but with most of my music I preferred the rack's normal levels and its own feet. The smaller glass platform had a sound signature somewhere inbetween. It had extra articulation through the bass and lower midrange but also still portrayed some of the rack's inherent stability and calmness. Still, with the platter removed I found the balance to be better.
 
Glass platters in place but without using them
As turned out eventually, adding the smaller glass platter to the rack with the Turntable Platter in place altered the sound, even when no component was placed on it. Most of the effects I noted above turned out to be attributable to the mere addition of the small glass platter. Removing it calmed down the forward midrange and hard treble and restored the more musically pleasant flow. Having the small platter in place but placing a component on top of it would dampen the midrange forwardness slightly but maintained the restriction of flow as the soundstage seemed to be compressed or tunnelled between the two layers of glass. Out of curiosity I removed the small glass platform and substituted it with a wood panel. Surprisingly, this had almost the same effect as the glass platter, but the added colouration focussed on a lower frequency. It wasn't better or worse, just different.
 
Removing the Turntable Platform
Now that I knew what the removal of the small glass platform did, I had no choice but to try the same with the big one. indeed again this made a difference and I am sorry to say that I preferred the sound without it. I hadn't noticed when installing it but upon removing it I noticed how the sound relaxed and the stage breathed more freely. Interestingly missing went a sense of focus in the midrange, with snares now having less attack and bite. But overall I prefer the more natural sound that the rack provides without platters in place.
 
After all, it isn't surprising that these large layers of glass influence the sound because they completely bypass the rack's inherent design, which is to eliminate platform levels for obvious reasons. I liked the Spider racks for their absense of colouration and the same is true for the Artesania rack. Adding platforms to the design seems to undermine their design. I do think however that the effect I heard was greatly increased by the height of the rack and the fact that it is situated between the speakers. Even if the speakers are setup almost two meters from the rear wall, the fact that they are dipoles probably also has something to do with this.
 
With a lower version of the Exoteryc rack or when the rack is setup next to one of the side walls in the listening room, the addition of either glass platforms probably wouldn't have the same effects as in my setup
 
CONCLUSION
The Artesania Exoteryc is quite simply the best audio rack that I have used. Not only is it flawless in design and adjustability; soundwise it is also perfect and a massive improvement over any rack that I have used. It takes the best qualities of Finite Elemente's Spider Rack and adds tonal richness, better low level resolution, deeper black, a more solid soundstage with better focus, deeper, more powerful bass and a superbly natural sound. And it does all this while retaining treble fluidity and airyness, overall articulation and dynamic expression.
 
The rack doesn't hide its highly technical nature, but I perceive it as a classic case of "Form Follows Function". This rack is just really well thought out and I personally think it looks spectacular. But more importantly, the added emotionality that this rack is able to squeeze out of my system is quite simply staggering.
the Exoteryc is an ideal complement to any significant level team....this furniture will be the straw that will fill and complete the set,...
Enrique Montesinos - (Google translation into English)

Here we see an overwhelming amount of detail the great harmonic richness as complete an instrument such as the piano, asserting the timbre of the instrument and musical color present in the dissonance so characteristic of this impressionistic work. The air that surrounds each of the notes from the lowest bass to the treble sharper transports us to the room it was recorded this piece. There is a greater extent both in the top where the highs are smoother and the bottom where the bass have better control and definition.

Much has happened since 1997, the year in which I acquired my first piece of furniture dedicated to audio equipment. And how could it be otherwise, given the attention they then professed by the Audio Video, the model in question was a table suspended shelves Double six Reference Series (the top end), belonging to, at the time , Spanish pop Crafts Audio manufacturer. However, a few years later and the result of restless and maverick spirit inherent in every company that continues to investigate towards a constant evolution to be always among the first firms dedicated to create the best sound mechanical insulation systems for audio possible domestic firm introduced us Aragonese Prestige Craft table, which involved the removal of shelves rested sandwich structure where the different pieces of equipment. With this upgrade which in turn of course not be released, the sound made in a clear increase in the presentation of the harmonic richness that is not lost due to the absorbent qualities characteristic of the materials used in the construction of these ( DM and neoprene lease the shelves of the previous model).
 
But not in accordance with these advances D. José Luis Lafarga, (with whom I exchanged long and tendidamente impressions during one of the missing SONIMAG), head of the firm has continued engaged in their constant search for perfection, which eventually led him to achieve that today is, undoubtedly one of the best options available in terms of furniture for audio without compromise: The table Crafts Audio Exoteryc special turntable platform before us.
 
Touchdown
 
I must admit that the mere physical presentation of it dwarfs previous models. In fact the diameter of the legs (pillars) support is 60mm (15mm more than the Reference and Prestige), representing an increase of 33%. There is a greater distance between the legs resulting in an increase in the space available inside intended for placement of devices. This weight gain and gives greater stability neutrality negligible due to structural resonance thereof. In turn, we have also modified the articulated arms that move in parallel and angular movements, which greatly simplifies the work of his predecessors adjustment to the Prestige series. Another significant improvement is the increase in size of the charge of support bowlers interior structure, and the fixing system (elastic and acoustically enhanced) by insulating discs which rest on parts of the system. In fact remain in its inverted position even without any part of them, which physically impossible in the Prestige model. Another improvement is striking, especially for those who have known / used previous versions, is the complete elimination of annoying pendulum suspended internal structure due to successful use of a four settings located in the bottom of the same and allow almost perfect fit.
 
This furniture can also optionally incorporating a special platform turntable. This platform is built on glass treated with triple sandwich structure (1 cm each sheet) resting on a stainless steel frame topped with conical legs with the same material and the shape of glass on top has a neoprene discs medium density expanded micro (as occurs with exchangeable bases for discs floor) on which rests the heavy glass. At the bottom of the legs are disposed tips we provide perfect leveling of the platform while remaining disengaged from the cabinet. If the weight of the base and is spectacular, about 50 kg, not less so is the incredible stiffness of it.
 
The set of furniture weighing around 100 kg rests on four discs (much larger than its predecessors) that allow us to play with two types of exchangeable bases either Neoprene (absorbent) or polyamide (to dissipate energy excess) as required by the very us our room acoustics.
 
Also the cabinet is supplied with dampers (2.4 kg each) that act both to remove the chassis micro vibrations produced by the transformers themselves, as for shielding digital device. In my case the result with electronic amplification of the serious charge of Genesis 350SE is really good. The serious subject and get a much higher definition. The piano has a greater aplomb and clarity especially in the lower octaves.
 
In combat
 
I started assembling the furniture manufacturer's instructions and making sure quedase perfectly level from the first stand up special top excellent platform for analog systems. Once satisfied that everything was in perfect order proceeded to install the equipment, which, to my pleasant surprise not involve much effort as with lower versions, because of the great work done in securing responsible for supporting disks parts system.
 
For evaluation used some of my most favorite albums. I decided to start with rock music, specifically the "Private Investigations" by Dire Straits that makes clear the neutrality excellent recordings transmitted regardless of the level of volume that takes place listening.
 
Then I went to try and behaved in a style so different as is the Jazz. In this case the chosen disc was "The Nutcracker Suite" by Duke Ellington (Columbia) version of Pure Pleasure 180 grams where we can clearly distinguish the perfect exquisite location of each of the musicians in this great Big Band. Specifically there are three issues that are a real treat for the ear: The Sugar Rum Cherry presents a sax with a lovely meaty juxtaposed with metals and all these perfectly clothed by the accompanying percussion dim and the fantastic textures the other two subjects Arabesque Cookie and Chinoiserie.
 
Switching to classical music in the album "Romeo and Juliet" by Prokofiev in version directed by Maazel (Decca) in front of the Cleveland Orchestra in the Dance of the Knights issue where the bass have a strong presence, with the use Esoteric furniture cleaning is achieved in a more than notable of these attacks, revealing a more defined scene and with a greater level of detail by the rest of the orchestra (eg percussion) who remained, until currently hidden while promoting increased sound image both in width and in depth.
 
The subject of the other dynamic is strong, with a level of silence between notes truly astonishing, resulting in a consequent increase in micro dynamics. This level of silence is particularly evident in recordings as a prelude n º 10 "The Submerged Cathedral" by Claude Debussy on the fantastic version of Claudio Arrau (Philips). Here we see an overwhelming amount of detail the great harmonic richness as complete an instrument such as the piano, asserting the timbre of the instrument and musical color present in the dissonance so characteristic of this impressionistic work. The air that surrounds each of the notes from the lowest bass to the treble sharper transports us to the room it was recorded this piece. There is a greater extent both in the top where the highs are smoother and the bottom where the bass have better control and definition.
 
Perhaps with my previous table, the Finite Elemente Pagode Master Reference,.... would give a more warm (not neutral), but at the cost of penalizing its dynamics and a more severe loose and uncontrolled.
 
Conclusion
 
Summarizing the Exoteryc is an ideal complement to any significant level team. Of course it will solve all the problems of our systems, but the truth is that if the other pieces of equipment are up and well resolved, this furniture will be the straw that will fill and complete the set, especially for holders of a good analog system. Using Crafts Audio Exoteryc table may be the detail that makes the difference between good and excellent.

Testimonials

This Artesania rack is amazing.
I am only now starting to appreciate what it is doing for the system's sound now that I have spent some time playing music through the system.
Thanks again for everything 

Regards
.....Tim 

Videos

Introduction to Artesania Audio

Artesania at Munich High Wnd show