TANNOY Legacy Arden floorstand speakers 15" driver 91dB 600w 990Hx440wx370D

TY 17 SF ARDEN
NZ$ 15,995.01 pr (incl. GST)
Tannoy Speakers

Tannoy aims to lead the industry through concentrating on innovative, high performance products

New

More than just a homage to its predecessor, the Legacy Series ARDEN Floor-Standing 15” Hi Fi
Loudspeaker further elevates the TANNOY HPD heritage of outstandingly transparent performance with the implementation of new, upscaled drivers and components – technology that was unavailable at the time. Simply put, ARDEN delivers legendary HPD performance to a new generation of music aficionados.

ARDEN - Heritage 2 way floor-standing loudspeaker based on famous HPD design for large roomsOriginal cabinet design and components provide a genuine reproduction of the break-though productDual Concentric driver based on the famous HPD 1974 pedigree technology provides class-leading coherence and point-source imagingSophisticated crossover network with 2 separate channels perfectly complements the Dual Concentric driver for a truly natural sound

“Now they’re coming back. Every element crucial to their breathtaking dynamic range, clarity of sound and classic look has been preserved. Refinements that reflect only true audio progress are being carefully added. Heritage is important to us, which is why the Legacy Series will be hand crafted by our skilled workers in Coatbridge, Scotland. Every speaker will include an ‘owner’s care package’ as well as a certificate of authenticity, signed by our experts who are making them. There are three speakers in the Legacy series: The ARDEN, CHEVIOT and EATON. The Dual Concentric Driver is based on the famous HPD 1974 pedigree technology, for that world famous, truly natural TANNOY sound”.

Andy Pardoe designed the new Legacy range and his background in pro audio would seem pretty perfect as these speakers are very much based on the pro-monitors of yesteryear that were used in studios that produced many a record readers will know and love.

The driver in the Ardens and they are an interesting design with the paper cone being fatter in the centre of the driver and thinner at the outer extremities…something designed to improve the speakers linear response. There’s a first order crossover on the tweeter and a 2nd order on the woofer.

Reviewers Comment: To my ears the new Legacy series are a nicer sounding speaker than the Prestige GRFs (sorry Tannoy) and their studio heritage screams out. I was particularly impressed when the high frequency output was upped a little and the speakers opened out and felt much more expansive. These are front ported and as such pretty unfussy about their positioning – important in the studio, but also important in the smaller home…and this makes sense given the importance of the Asian market for Tannoy, particularly their speakers in the higher ranges. We didn’t get to heat the Cheviot or Eden speakers but all look and feel exceptionally well made and the Arden’s we did hear sounded lovely, particularly when cranked up to good sound levels. Tannoy may well be onto a winner here!

Following the recently revived Prestige range, Tannoy is now bringing three models from its original Legacy series back to life.

If you hark back to the era of flared trousers, Saturday Night Fever and the Ford Capri, Tannoy has just the thing for you. For those wanting to relive the glory days of 1970s hi-fi, the company is bringing back its Arden, Cheviot and Eaton speaker ranges.

However, the Devon and Berkeley models from the original five-strong Legacy line-up are not being reintroduced.

Like the Tannoy Gold Reference GRF, now a permanent addition to the Prestige range, the Legacy models will be built in the company's Coatbridge plant in Scotland. There had been much speculation that the Coatbridge factory would close under its new owners, Music Group - something which the company has since denied.

For our readers who are too young to remember, the Legacy series uses Tannoy's Dual Concentric Drivers based on the firm's HPD technology first developed in 1974, housed in traditional high density cabinets.

EATON is a stand-mount Eaton and is the smallest speaker in the revamped range with 10” driver @ 87.5dB with 400w power rating, size 520H x 350W x 250D mm.

CHEVIOT is in the middle and is a two-way floorstander with 12” driver @ 89dB with 500w power rating, size 850H x 440W x 260D mm 

ARDEN is the largest model is the floorstander with 15” driver @ 91dB with 600w power rating, size 990H x 660W x 370D mm. 

All three models are equipped with a two-band energy control with boost and attenuation control for fine-tuning the speakers to the listening room they're used in.

They all come with gold-plated, bi-wireable binding posts. A fifth binding post provides grounding to reduce radio interference and improve midrange clarity.

"These were our breakthrough speakers in the 1970s, which redefined the listening experience in studios and homes across the world," says Tannoy..

"The Legacy series will be hand crafted by our skilled workers in Coatbridge. Every speaker will include an ‘owner’s care package’ as well as a certificate of authenticity, signed by our experts," it adds.

We have shown indicative pricing but final prices to be confirmed and we will update this story as soon as we get them.

Features

Specifications

Reviews

Videos

Features

- Heritage 2 way floor-standing loudspeaker based on famous HPD design for large sized rooms
 - Cabinet design and components provide authentic reproduction of original HPD loudspeaker system
 - Dual Concentric 15” paper cone driver based on famous HPD 1974 pedigree technology provides class-leading coherence and point-source imaging
 - Sophisticated crossover network with 2 separate channels perfectly complements Dual Concentric driver for truly natural sound

Front-mounted control panel houses a two-band energy control with boost and attenuation compensation for room design and tailoring to personal preference which allows you to tailor high-frequency output, with ‘treble energy’ adjustable through 6dB in 1.5dB steps, and ‘treble roll-off’ adjustable though 8dB in 2dB steps, via convenient front-mounted controls. ‘

Every element crucial to their breathtaking dynamic range, clarity of sound and classic look has been preserved,’ said Bjorg Agustsdottir, of Tannoy. ‘Only refinements that reflect true audio progress are being carefully added.’ 

Specifications

Power Handling: 140 - 560 watts
Dual Concentric Drive Unit: 15” driver, 600watts
Crossover: 1.1 kHz
Bi-wired, hard wired passive, low loss. 1st order high pass ±3dB over 1kHZ to 30 kHz shelving, 2dB to -6dB per octave over 5 kHZ to 30 kHZ slope
Enclosure: Triple distributed port
 5x 4mm 24ct WBT binding posts
Dimensions: 602 x 910 x 362 mm (WxHxD)
Weight: 41 kg ea
 

Reviews

What we do know is the British bulldog is back and snarling. We like that....
Peter Familari

If Michael J. Fox went back to a 70s recording studio he would have been KO’d by the sound of Tannoy’s HPD Series of speakers. By any standard the HPDs had life-like veracity, could play deafeningly loud driven by a handful of watts.

They were also inherently rhythmic and overtly musical. Which begs the question “Why were they discontinued?”

You won’t have to die wondering because Tannoy has revitalised the HPD speakers and more importantly, has stayed true to the initial concept releasing three Legacy series models called the Arden, Cheviot and Eaton. Can’t get monikers more British than these.

Point is this trio use a Dual Concentric driver based on the revered HPD 1974 technology. Tannoy released its original HPD models in 1947 and all models inclusive of the Monitor Black, Silvers, Reds, Golds and HPDs shared the same basic design with minor variations.

Tannoy reintroduced the HPD models in 1974 until production ceased in 1980.

HPD technology features included a plastic magnet cover finished in a natural buff colour without any paint applied. These models also had a gold cast chassis basket and a low frequency driver surround made from plastic-foam. This low frequency driver came with eight ribbed girders attached to its rear to reduce cone break-up.

Material used in the HPD driver magnet was Ticonal-G. The low frequency cone was an ultra-low resonance model that achieved 20Hz compared to the 30Hz of previous Tannoy designs.

To be sure, one glimpse of the HPDs reveals that famous iconic, classic styling featuring a large cabinet and largish driver is back, big-time.

There’s no mistaking these speakers are anything other than kosher Tannoys.

To illustrate this point, Tannoy builds the HPDs by hand, in pre-Brexit UK.

Reasons enough to make Michael J. Fox want to be British. But he ain’t and neither are we. What we do know is the British bulldog is back and snarling. We like that....

Verdict - Break out your wing collars, kick back and let these retro monsters take you on a sensational sonic trip. - Score 5 STARS

SUMMARY: Should I buy the Tannoy Legacy Arden? If you’ve got the listening space for them, the Arden are an absolute must to audition. Even if you’re turned off by the ’70s styling – it won’t be for everyone – the performance is so utterly beguiling that you might be shopping for flares and paisley wallpaper before the end of the first song.
There’s also very little on the market that’s quite like the Arden. There are speakers that offer a less coloured sound, a more detailed treble, or more agile bass, but few (if any) that offer such breathtaking scale combined with wonderful subtlety and pinpoint imaging.

EXTENDED REVIEW: What are the Tannoy Legacy Arden? British hi-fi legend Tannoy, under new ownership by Music Group, has donned its rose-tinted glasses to reintroduce and rework three pairs of the brand’s speakers from the ’70s. The Eaton, Cheviot and Arden are all designed and handmade in Scotland, with this, the Arden, being the largest of the new Legacy-series trio.

And large it certainly is, housing a massive dual-concentric driver featuring a 15-inch paper cone. You’d better make sure you have the room size to cope with these, because there’s some serious air gonna get shifted…

Tannoy Legacy Arden – Design and features

The Arden are going to polarise opinion. Hi-fi design often does, but ’70s wood with sharp edges and right angles even more so. Oh, and burgundy cloth grilles. Keep those grilles on and you’d be forgiven for mistaking these speakers for a pair of venerable drinks cabinets filled with Galliano and crème de menthe.

Personally I’m a big fan, but they won’t be a good fit for everyone, nor every home. And be warned that these are not just bulky, but very heavy – getting them up a flight of stairs would be the stuff of nightmares.

The sides and top of the cabinet are 19mm thick and have an immaculately joined and finished walnut veneer. There’s even a pot of wax included in the box to ensure your speakers’ wood doesn’t lose its lustre – a nice touch.

Remove those nylon-cloth grilles – there are three per speaker – and you uncover in turn that enormous dual-concentric driver, the crossover-adjustment panel below, and then the three gaping bass ports at the bottom.

The dual-concentric driver consists of a 15-inch paper pulp cone with a rubber surround, bullseyed with a 1.3-inch aluminium-magnesium alloy dome tweeter. Both have an edge-wound voice coil.

The gold-coloured crossover panel enables tweaking of the Arden’s treble performance by means of two gold-plated finger bolts. The top bolt can be unscrewed and moved to reduce or increase treble energy, while the lower bolt adjusts treble roll-off. This is the same system as used in the original 1974 Arden models, although the crossover itself is all new.

Around the back are two pairs of 24ct-gold-plated WBT banana-plug terminals for bi-wiring, although jumper cables are supplied for those who don’t care to bi-wire. An additional terminal’s included on each speaker for optional grounding.

For contact with the ground, you get two screw-in choices – isolation spikes for carpets or adjustable feet for hard floors.

Sensitivity is a high 93dB, and impedance a very standard 8 ohms, so you shouldn’t have too much trouble partnering with quite modestly powered amplification. Similarly the front porting ensures that you’ll be OK positioning the Arden with their backs close to a wall. So although these speakers require plenty of space to accommodate both their physical and sonic presence, they’re otherwise rather versatile.

Tannoy Legacy Arden – Sound quality

I mostly tested the Tannoy Arden wired with Atlas Mavros speaker cable to either the Musical Fidelity M6 Encore all-in-one or Leema Acoustics Tucana II Anniversary Edition amp. With the latter I used a Chord Hugo 2 DAC and Microsoft Surface Pro 4 for a digital source, or a Rega RP8 turntable and Apheta 2 cartridge for some vinyl action.

I started with the treble settings on the Arden at level for both energy and roll-off. First impressions were of massive scale, and a warm, laidback presentation that could almost have come with its own bottle of port and a fondue set. Clinical and uncoloured it was not, but it certainly wasn’t unpleasant. With the treble energy ramped up one notch, things came alive. Boy did they come alive.

Listening to Josh Ritter’s ‘Sermon on the Rocks’ the piano at the opening of ‘Homecoming’ popped and shimmered in the air with utter perfection, swiftly joined by the kickdrum thudding with real gut-punching authority. As the song built to its climax, the unbelievably expansive soundstage filled with layer upon layer until I could almost feel a wall of air being pushed towards me by those massive drivers.

Playing some bass-heavy Massive Attack and Gorillaz, the bottom end was truly astonishing – deep and solid without ever feeling lumpen or loose.

With something more intimate – the haunting title track from Joe Purdy’s ‘Canyon Joe’ – the rock-solid imaging ensured that Purdy sat slap-bang in between the two speakers. The level of realism was simply astonishing. Few speakers can give you that feeling of actually being at a live gig, but these are just such a pair.

Out of interest, I whacked the treble energy up to full, but even with a little roll-off, this proved just too harsh and fatiguing in my setup.

Tannoy had mentioned that the Arden really shine with female vocals, so I played some of the tracks on Sam Beam & Jesca Hoop’s ‘Love Letter For Fire’ where Hoop takes the lead. They weren’t wrong. That sweet, warm mid-range released so beautifully and also retained superb separation when Beam harmonised – two distinct voices singing perfectly together without ever muddying into one.

Moving onto some classical in the form of Glenn Gould’s 1955 recording of Bach’s Goldberg Variations, the Arden coped well with the difficult transients. The piano notes stopped and started with enough edge to do justice to the incredibly intricate playing.

As long as you like a little honey in your musical diet, there’s really nothing the Arden can’t handle. The touch of added sweetness and warmth means the Arden are a little better suited to acoustic pieces, but electronica still comes off well.

Should I buy the Tannoy Legacy Arden?

If you’ve got the listening space for them, the Arden are an absolute must to audition. Even if you’re turned off by the ’70s styling – it won’t be for everyone – the performance is so utterly beguiling that you might be shopping for flares and paisley wallpaper before the end of the first song.

There’s also very little on the market that’s quite like the Arden. There are speakers that offer a less coloured sound, a more detailed treble, or more agile bass, but few (if any) that offer such breathtaking scale combined with wonderful subtlety and pinpoint imaging.

Verdict

Break out your wing collars, kick back and let these retro monsters take you on a sensational sonic trip.
Score  5 STARS

Key Features
Dual-concentric driver with 15-inch paper cone and 1.3-inch aluminium-magnesium alloy dome tweeter
35Hz-30Khz frequency response
150W continuous, 600W peak power handling
93dB sensitivity, 8ohm impedance
Front ported

Videos

Tannoy Legacy series