Finite Elemente

World class Audio Racks from Germany
Music has always been a sensual experience, the expression of freedom and lifestyle.

After a period of uncertanty, we are please to once again be able to offer you these world class audio racks.

Music has always been a sensual experience, the expression of freedom and lifestyle. 

At finite elemente we took our entire experience to achieve a quality in both design and technology without imposing any restrictions what-so ever on the music, while allowing the full power and passion of this most natural human form of expression to be illuminated down to the finest detail. 
 
Internationally renowned, multi-award winning audio racks and isolation accessories made in Germany.
 
Finite Elemente are the racks preferred by many of the audio reviewers. Their components regularly win awards every year for their excellence and market leading solutions. Add to this their undoubted elegant design and they make a superb choice for maximising the outcome of your gear. 

Reviews

Reviews

....it shows the tonal character – or if you prefer the term: maximum neutrality – of a hi-fi component even more so to its best advantage.
Cai Brockmann - Image HiFi

With the Pagode Signature the inner and outer dynamics of the music improve audibly, the bass and fundamental tonal ranges appear slimmer and more levely, but not emaciated. hey are clearly defined and integrated better into the flow of the organised happenings. And the virtual spatial expansion appears greater and more transparent, with the acoustic form and focussing of the individual instruments and vocals being more clearly outlined.

 
After seven years the Finite Elemente Pagode E series is now getting a successor that will certainly also become a modern classic in audio rooms. The Pagode Signature promises an even better sound experience – not least because it comes with all the best extra features from its predecessor fitted as standard.
 
The rack specialists at Finite Elemente had somehow felt the pressure from below from their successful model Pagode: it seemed that the puristic and inexpensive Spider (image hifi 4/2001) was practically snapping at the heels of the performance of the Pagode basic model, whereas at the other end of the scale the innovative Pagode Master Reference was beginning to vanish in much higher sound spheres. It was therefore time for a thorough upgrade of the Pagode range, to clearly distance it from the surprisingly good Spider rack and at the same time not to lose sight of the Reference.
 
Luis Fernandes and Bernd Brockhoff, the minds behind Finite Elemente, equipped the former E series, now appropriately called Signature, as standard with all of the extras that had previously been on the list of available extras, but were ordered by the majority of the customers in any case. The new Signature model therefore is already factory-fitted with the better shelves – a triple-layer sandwich of MDF and plywood – and their support on spikes, in addition there is the cunning fixing of the shelves in the frame. And guess what: although the price of the Signature would initially seem clearly higher, it turns out instead to be a net zero increase in view of the cost of the appropriately tuned predecessor model. Instead of a price increase, what you get is a much better equipped basic model.

The structure and design of the Pagode Signature are clearly based on the Master Reference, but Finite Elemente dispenses with the complex resonator technology and with double side uprights. The Signature uses a single T-strut made of solid aluminum for the connection and stabilization of the rack.

The basic fundamental starting point of any Pagode Signature rack is a wooden frame gently tapering off to the sides, inside of which the shelf makes contact via four spikes to the sturdy frame. The floor coupling is made using four M8 spikes, that are screwed into corresponding threaded sockets, and then balanced and locked. The enclosed small hollowed pads can be fitted to protect sensitive floors from scratches. The particularly stable bottom level is also available separately as a platform and is especially suitable for heavyweight power amps thanks to a load capacity of 50 kg. The Finite Elemente logo can then be fitted depending on the shape of the components – either wide or deep – at the correct position on the platform.

With the complete Signature rack the sides of the bottom shelf are mounted on two striking aluminium uprights, which are variable in heights of either 60, 85, 93.5 and 140 centimetres and stabilized above the top shelf by a crossbar of solid wood. These aluminum supports – available either in silver grey anodized or high-gloss polished – have a double row of holes with 30 millimetre spacing, enabling the tension fitting of up to six shelves using conical side spikes. Incidentally the Signature is now available in the wide version that can also easily accommodate 19 inch components.

Finite Elemente states the maximum load capacity at 25 kilos per tensioned shelf. This figure strikes me as being very much on the conservative side and is probably considerably higher if the loading is evenly balanced. And whereas the overall finishing of the rack is, as expected, top class, the Signature also comes into its own with a dramatically increased rigidity – which also has a positive effect on the sound. However, in spite of its rather extreme design the top levels should never be used as handles! But you don't carry your record player around by the pick-up arm, or do you?

The shelves of the Signature rack are always kept in an exactly central position, even when tilted for transport: Four damping disks of microcellular rubber, screwed connections with perfectly tailored locking nuts with the appearance of chrome-plated disks, ensure not only an extremely constant joint gap between the shelf and the frame, but also a defined pretensioning of the sandwich on four spikes, which dissipates any parasitic vibrations into the tensioning frame.

The relatively lightweight, cleverly designed Pagode Signature already has its own easily comprehensible, uniquely positive effect on the sound performance of a hi-fi component. Which is something I personally would not claim for certain other highly praised competition products, that dampen the sound to death using lead or sand – resulting in leaden sound, which is not always the perfect choice for a living room...

With the Pagode Signature the inner and outer dynamics of the music improve audibly, the bass and fundamental tonal ranges appear slimmer and more levely, but not emaciated. They are clearly defined and integrated better into the flow of the organised happenings. And the virtual spatial expansion appears greater and more transparent, with the acoustic form and focussing of the individual instruments and vocals being more clearly outlined.

Tonally the Signature is very reserved and does exactly what I expect from an excellent piece of audio furniture, namely nothing. Much more it shows the tonal character – or if you prefer the term: maximum neutrality – of a hi-fi component even more so to its best advantage.

It is however possible to increase such qualities even more, and it couldn’t be more simple. The Finite Elemente Ceraballs are a great opportunity to finally get rid of the indifferent rubber feet mostly fitted as standard to audio components. A set of four of these effective Ceraballs cost around 90 euros – a first-class investment that has a positive effect on practically all surfaces and a clear benefit not only for the Signature. Incidentally: Whereas the design of the Spider rack means that four Ceraballs are required per audio component, with the Pagode Signature I often only need three Ceraballs to produce excellent results. I haven't yet bothered working out when the saving of one Ceraball per component would offset the higher investment costs of the Pagode Signature ..

A optional must: Ceraballs optimize the performance with the Pagode 

this arrangement of platforms and racks did deliver a significantly greater working dynamic range. In my view this has to be due to superior control of vibration and resonance,
Martin Colloms - HIFI CRITIC

In a high-end context it was abundantly clear that these German supports stands performed well, allowing much of the inherent potential of top-grade audio components to be properly voiced. That quality fortunately manages to encompass the musically-involving aspects of rhythm, good timing, dynamic expression and beat, together with strong audiophile qualities - generous, deep soundstages, a natural wide frequency range, unfatiguing sound, plus high resolution at all volume levels, and a wide dynamic range.

EQUIPMENT RACKS are often seen as merely a convenient way of stacking the electronics; they generally lack glamour and can often look dreadful. Nevertheless racks deserve to be taken seriously - even for basic hi-fi, a simple audio stand will "outperform" a coffee table or sideboard.
 
It's legitimate to ask how a rack can have a "sound". Well, technically it may, even before any equipment is placed on it. In any room the reproduced sound impinges on everything. Vibration induced in the floor finds its way up into the rack structure, setting up resonances which selectively reradiate sound energy, adding a false reverberance to what we hear. Just as the cabinet strongly determines speaker sound quality, the structural design and materials used for a rack or platform will strongly influence the quality of the entire system founded on it.
 
Much thought has been devoted to this subject and some amazing implementations have surfaced. The German manufacturer Finfite Elemente has enjoyed conspicuous success in this specialised field, and many design objectives have been addressed in its Pagode series

Tensioning is a key factor with all these designs, the alloy framing of the stands and platforms are high absorption Canadian maple maple . Load capacity of the HD series wiht its double vertical side pillars, accepts 60kg per stage.

These racks rise from a base stage which is also designed to be used as an individual power amplifier platform and here the load values are 120kg. In addition to a wide range of fixed and adjustable heights up to 850mm, the more costly frames comes with footprints capable of taking the largest audio items made.  I've relied on Mana stands for some years both for reviewing at all price levels and in my own system. These compromise both the base frame designs and the advanced multier combinations and these formed the basis of comparison with the more costly and undeniably more elegant - Pagode constructions.

 
Finishes on the review modelswere pale maple for the wood and silver alloy pillars. Delivered direct from Germany the stands arrived on a sealed pallet, ready assembled save for the shelf panels and spiked interfaces. All were tight, solid, and showed on inspection a low-resonance signature. As they were bedded down there was a confidence-inspiring sense of rigidity, of innate mechanical integrity.
 
Rhythm and timing are important to me, areas where the Mana stands excel, whereas other supports - often heavy and visually elegant - have failed miserably. The importer claimed that when fully set up my chosen system would play both louder and softer with the Pagodes. In other words, it could run a lower volumes without loss of detail or resolution yet it would also play louder before either room or aural overload set in.
And he was right: this arrangement of platforms and racks did deliver a significantly greater working dynamic range. In my view this has to be due to superior control of vibration and resonance, since a greater microphonic effect is well known to add false loudness to lower level sounds yet mask detail, while peaks then show added "shout" and congestion.
For many listeners this quality alone would win immediate approval for the Pagode. My attention was also drawn to the fine sense of rhythm and the natural dynamics. While the Mana system compared well on rhythm, and in some instances achieved still more dynamic power, the Pagode set, in the longer term, proved to be more evenly balanced.

For the CD player tests, Pagode had the subjective effect of significantly reduced jitter; high frequencies were purer, showing more delicacy and subtlety, greater air and transparency. The mid sounded very neutral, highly resolved an with superior focus and vocal separation. Stage width and depth were increased, while the bass lines went deeper and were better resolved.

 
Checking out the Pagode power amplifier platforms (Pfund! 299), I confess to being surprised just how much the quality of a hugely heavy and comparatively inert lump such as the Krell monoblock could be enhanced by a double-spiked solid maple plate and frame of Finite Elemente design.
........ Martin Collons